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The Home Computer Christmas Wars

One for all you fellow nerds of a certain age, from the pages of Paleotronic Magazine. 🙂

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1980s 8-Bit 3D Adventures with Freescape – Paleotronic Magazine

Impressive stuff, and a reminder of the ingenuity of the folks developing games back in the 80’s.

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Codecademy vs. The BBC Micro

A good long-read about the history of ‘computer literacy’ as we did it back in the 80s, and comparisons to how we’re attempting to do so today.

Brings back some happy memories for me. 🙂

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Phil Salvador reviews the 1988 computer game Charlie Chaplin. Or is it a bleak take on the silent movie era?

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A New Lunar Lander for the ZX81 / Timex Sinclair 1000

This brings back memories. I owned a Sinclair ZX81 for a few years in the early 1980s. It got very hot, and was prone to crashing and resetting itself occasionally, usually after I’d finished typing in a program listing.

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The Grouch for Mac

I found this video via a recent Daring Fireball post, which in turn was commenting on the first of a series on TidBITS looking back into their archive of Mac news items.

Adam Engst:

RAM Doubler is a single small extension that literally doubles your RAM. It’s not guessing at a 2:1 compression ratio, like Salient’s AutoDoubler and DiskDoubler (now owned by Symantec) — you actually see your total memory being twice your built-in memory. Since RAM Doubler is an extension, there are no controls, no configuration. You just install it and it doubles the amount of application RAM you have available.

A number of people have expressed disbelief that such a feat is possible, saying that they’d avoid anything like RAM Doubler because it’s obviously doing strange things to memory, which isn’t safe. […] > Needless to say, since RAM Doubler has only been out for a few days, we haven’t been testing for long, but I can honestly say that neither of us have noticed anything out of the ordinary during this time.

John Gruber:

From a low-level computer science operating systems perspective, the classic Mac OS was dangerously primitive. But from a high-level user interface perspective, it remains amazing. To install RAM Doubler — software that radically changed the way the OS worked — all you had to do was copy one file to the Extensions folder in your System folder. To uninstall, you just moved it out of that folder. That’s it. One file in one special folder and then restart the machine.